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December 2nd, 2007, 12:35 PM   #1
 
Joined: Dec 2007
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Quantum Computing...

Anyone know off-hand the state of solid-state quantum computing today?
Number of bits... Time before the machines stop working... etc...
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December 4th, 2007, 07:08 AM   #2
 
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Re: Quantum Computing...

That's pretty bad, when we're talking about how long it takes before the machine breaks. :mrgreen: At least last I knew, not much progress had been made beyond very simple computations. I remains to be seen whether any new significant breakthroughs can be achieved, ones which would allow the quantum computer to actually function as well as the PC's we have these days. The only quantum calculation I remember was where 15 was factored into 3 and 5. Not very many bits are required for that. :roll:
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December 4th, 2007, 12:11 PM   #3
 
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Re: Quantum Computing...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Infinity
The only quantum calculation I remember was where 15 was factored into 3 and 5. Not very many bits are required for that. :roll:
Yeah, they've gotten a little more complicated with quantum computing in general, but the problem is they can't get that into a solid state machine. It's just a big blob of entangled atoms.

the "how long before it breaks" part is mostly because entangled particles don't like to stay entangled for very long.

Last I knew, they had gotten a 3 bit machine to work for a few hours.. but that was a couple of years ago.
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December 6th, 2007, 07:28 AM   #4
 
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Re: Quantum Computing...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Infinity
The only quantum calculation I remember was where 15 was factored into 3 and 5. Not very many bits are required for that. :roll:
I read the research paper on that one. Simple as it sounds (it's the simplest possible problem for Shor's algorithm -- it requires odd nonsquares) it was possible only because the "code" was extensively "hand-optimized", and even so the errors of measurement made reading the result less-than-obvious.

21 won't be nearly as easy, and 35 seems all but impossible.
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December 8th, 2007, 09:14 AM   #5
 
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Re: Quantum Computing...

So is a quantum computer really digital, or is it something else?
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December 8th, 2007, 12:17 PM   #6
 
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Re: Quantum Computing...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Infinity
So is a quantum computer really digital, or is it something else?
Like anything quantum: Yes and no.
Basically, each bit can be used in more than one computation at the same time, so it can have a state of 1 for computation A and 0 for computation B. Suddenly, you have a lot more power.
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December 8th, 2007, 06:14 PM   #7
 
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Posts: 187
Re: Quantum Computing...

I have a question: if a person wants to study about quantum computing, then does that person also has to know quantum physics? (Reason I'm asking this is because the names of the topics sound similar "quantum" computing and "quantum" physics). I was interested in quantum computing, but I don't really want to study physics.
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December 8th, 2007, 07:49 PM   #8
 
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Re: Quantum Computing...

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny
I have a question: if a person wants to study about quantum computing, then does that person also has to know quantum physics? (Reason I'm asking this is because the names of the topics sound similar "quantum" computing and "quantum" physics). I was interested in quantum computing, but I don't really want to study physics.
Yes and no. At this stage in its development, the people working on it are all physicists, and maybe some chemists. As our capacity and understanding grow more, you'll need physics less, and CS more. At the same time, it is very (I repeat: very) helpful to understand why something works the way it does, rather than just how it works.

Assuming you're in high school (Yes?), I would guess that by the time you would be at a stage to be "researching" quantum computing, it will be at a much more advanced stage... but the future is a fickle mistress...

I've thrown out far too many good one liners in far too short of a time span on this forum... AND I'm humble.
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December 8th, 2007, 08:28 PM   #9
 
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Re: Quantum Computing...

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny
I have a question: if a person wants to study about quantum computing, then does that person also has to know quantum physics?
Of course you'd have to know quantum mechanics. Just tell me how much of this makes sense to you without knowing quantum mechanics:
http://arxiv.org/pdf/quant-ph/0112176
CRGreathouse is offline  
December 8th, 2007, 08:29 PM   #10
 
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Re: Quantum Computing...

Plus, there's no such thing as a quantum computer, not yet. The factorization of 15 was done under very controlled conditions, in a lab not a standalone unit.
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December 8th, 2007, 09:36 PM   #11
 
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Re: Quantum Computing...

Thanks to cknapp and CRGreathouse for the informations on quantum computing.

I have another question: In general (not necessary only quantum computing), if someone wants to study computer science, then does that person also has to study physics? I don't have interest studying physics, but I would like computer science.
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December 9th, 2007, 08:52 AM   #12
 
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Re: Quantum Computing...

Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny
Thanks to cknapp and CRGreathouse for the informations on quantum computing.

I have another question: In general (not necessary only quantum computing), if someone wants to study computer science, then does that person also has to study physics? I don't have interest studying physics, but I would like computer science.
At my university I need to take physics 1 (Mechanics) and physics 2 (Electromagnetism) for a CS degree. I would recommend taking these, even if you don't "need" to (Physics 1 to understand physics 2, and physics 2 to help understand how electricity works). An intro digital design/circuit analysis class (Usually Electrical Eng., sometimes physics) would be useful as well.
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December 9th, 2007, 10:54 AM   #13
 
Joined: Dec 2007
Posts: 187
Re: Quantum Computing...

Quote:
Originally Posted by cknapp
At my university I need to take physics 1 (Mechanics) and physics 2 (Electromagnetism) for a CS degree. I would recommend taking these, even if you don't "need" to (Physics 1 to understand physics 2, and physics 2 to help understand how electricity works). An intro digital design/circuit analysis class (Usually Electrical Eng., sometimes physics) would be useful as well.
Yes, I'm planning to take some physics classes in my future military career (Nuclear Program in Navy). But, my question is, physics and computer science are not related, are they (excluding quantum computing)?
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December 9th, 2007, 01:47 PM   #14
 
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Re: Quantum Computing...

You won't need any advanced physics, no.
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January 21st, 2009, 06:28 AM   #15
 
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Re: Quantum Computing

I like Quantum Computing very much.
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