Overclocking

Dec 2007
37
0
I don't know about you, but I was always one of those people who was desperate to try to overclock his computer, but was too afraid to do something about it because it costs serious money and being untrained can lead to some serious damage. But now, I got my self a brand new computer that's quite nice in terms of performance, but I would like to see what's it capable of and what I can get from it. I read an article in a very good computer magazine about overclocking and realized that they were using a motherboard that is the same brand as mine, a processor that was also the same brand as well as the graphics card and they got some impressing results. This definitely sparked some extra interest about the matter so I got an idea to talk to you people and see what do you have to say about it. Maybe you could even share some advise how to go about my case. :)
 
Jul 2008
13
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Well, I know as much or less than you do, but heck yeah, overclocking does seem pretty cool. I don't really think it's possible for me since I have naught but a laptop. Maybe someday that 3GHz Intel quad core will finally below one grand on newegg and then I can have some fun.

For my curiosity and for the folks here who actually know this stuff, what processor/mother board are you considering overclocking?
 
Dec 2007
37
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I apologize for the late response.. This is what I have:

CPU: Intel Core 2 Duo E8400 3.00 GHz
GPU: NVIDIA GeForce 88000 600Mhz / 512Mb DDR3
MTB: Asus P5K 1333MHz (FSB)
RAM: 4Gb (I think DDR2 667Mhz, but I don't know for sure.. Can't find no record of this..)

These are the vital parts. The cooling and the power can always be adjusted to fit the potentially overclocked configuration..
 
Dec 2007
414
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Gosh ! Your computer was already quite impressive in terms of capabilities ... did you eventually overclock it ? From what I heard around me, it's always possible to overclock up to a certain percentage but over a certain limit you endanger your hardware (because quite often the cooling system cannot handle the heating of the computer components anymore).
 
Sep 2009
13
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Overclocking is the process of running a computer component at a higher clock rate (more clock cycles per second) than it was designed for or was specified by the manufacturer, usually practiced by enthusiasts seeking an increase in the performance of their computers. Some of them purchase low-end computer components which they then overclock to higher speeds, or overclock high-end components to attain levels of performance beyond the specified values. Others overclock outdated components to keep pace with new system requirements, rather than purchasing new hardware.
 
Sep 2009
11
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I wouldn't dare to overclock my computer for it may lead to serious damage, I'm not a tech guy so I don't know how to do this also, to be honest I'm also interested with other people's answers.
 
G

Guest

Overclocking may need to complete system damage if not implied with a skilled person.